Caucasian Shepherd Dog

Caucasian Shepherd Dog-pets-dog breeds

The Caucasian Shepherd Dog is a large breed of dog that is popular in Russia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia. It is extremely popular in Georgia, which has always been the principal region of penetration of Caucasian shepherd dogs. The official standard of this breed is fundamentally based on the dogs taken from Georgia.

Because the dog breed was registered by the USR, the FCI standard of this breed indicates that its origin is the USSR. However, the breed is native to countries of the Caucasus region including Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan.



Also known as Caucasian Ovcharka or Baskhan (Karachay) pariy, Caucasian shepherd dogs are strongly boned, muscular, and even-tempered molossers. Plain dogs have a shorter coat and appear taller as they are more lightly built. Mountain dog types have a heavier coat and are more muscularly built. Caucasian ovcharka are large dogs; however, there is no recorded maximum height or weight. The minimum height for females is 64 centimetres (25 in), with a desirable height between 67 and 70 centimetres (26 and 28 in).

The minimum weight for females is 45 kilograms (99 lb). The minimum height for males is 68 centimetres (27 in), with a desirable height between 72 and 75 centimetres (28 and 30 in). The minimum weight for males is 50 kilograms . The Caucasian shepherd is rather intelligent; however, they can be insolent and refuse to listen at times. They also can be fairly aggressive towards people they do not know and with incorrect handling this can be problematic. This can be overcome by proper training.


The Caucasian Shepherd Dog is generally healthy and long-lived, averaging a life span of 10–12 years. Some dogs may have health issues in the form of hip dysplasia, obesity and occasional heart problems, but the majority of these dogs are healthy if taken care of correctly. Good dog breeders use genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the chances of diseases in the puppies.

The ears of the Caucasian Shepherd Dog are traditionally cropped, although some modern dogs are unaltered, as many people believe that this practice is unethical and cruel. If brought up by someone with extensive knowledge on the needs of a Caucasian Shepherd Dog, the chances of health problems should lower dramatically.

Exercise and play time are a crucial part of the Caucasian Shepherd Dog's life to help prevent obesity. Outdoor activities such as hiking, chasing balls and retrieving flying discs can be a good outlet of releasing energy.


Caucasian Shepherd Dogs require very specific and detailed training. From the ages of 0–9 months the obedience of the dog has already been formed. It is recommended that an expert begins to train the dog from the ages of 7–8 months old. The training that is involved in this early stage should be light guidance on the teaching of obedience.

Puppy school has been described as a bad option for the Caucasian Shepherd Dog.They do not tolerate other dogs very well and get out of control easily. This can be difficult to manage even if they are still young. After the early stages and training of a Caucasian Shepherd Dogs life, they can move on to learn about how to herd different types of livestock and defend them if the situation arises.

It is important to expose the dog to extensive amounts of socialization to teach it that not all humans are enemies, starting this routine from a young age could be helpful. Caucasian Shepherd Dogs are not recommended to be adopted into families with young children because of their guardian instinct and powerful bodies.

Breed classification

Fédération Cynologique Internationale classification:

·         FCI Pinscher and Schnauzer, Molossoid and Swiss Mountain Dog Group
·         Section 2: Molossian breeds
·         Section 2.2: Mountain types
·         Russia: Caucasian Shepherd Dog
·         The American Kennel Club include the breed in the working group.


The aggressive nature of the Caucasian Ovcharka makes it one of the most risky dog breeds to own for if not trained properly it will routinely snap at strangers or anyone they perceive as a threat.

Catalan Sheepdog

Catalan Sheepdog-pets-dog breeds

The Catalan sheepdog  is a breed of Catalan Pyrenean dog used as a sheepdog. This dog is bred in Europe, especially in Spain, Finland, Germany, and Sweden.


Catalan sheepdogs range in size from 17 to 19 in (45 to 55 cm) in height and 45 to 60 lb (20 to 27 kg) in weight for males, with females being smaller. Their coat is long and either flat or slightly wavy, and ranges from fawn to dark sable and light to dark grey. There is also a short-haired variety of this breed, but it is nearly extinct.

Size and weight

Height at withers: 47−55 cm and 20−25 kg for male dogs; from 45−53 cm and 17–21 kg for females.

Hair and hair color

Long and limp and a little curled. Seen from afar the dog seems to be unicolour and may have lighter shadings at the limbs. When seen close up, it is noticeable that the colour comes from a mixture of hairs of different colour shades: fawn, brown more or less reddish, grey and black. Long, flat, or very slightly wavy, rough with abundant undercoat on the whole posterior third of the body. On the head a beard, moustaches, tuft and eyebrows which do not affect sight can be noticed. Tail well covered with hair as are all four limbs. It is noticeable that during moulting a typical phenomenon may be observed: it occurs in two periods. First of all it affects the coat on the front part, giving the impression of two halves with different coats; then moults the hind part of the dog and everything becomes uniform again.


This breed is used for herding and as a pet dog. Because of its intelligence, the Gos D'Atura, like most sheepdogs, is easy to train. This cheerful dog excels at dog-sports, such as agility and doggy-dance. In spite of its appearance, this courageous dog is also used as a watch-dog. An "all-around-dog" and great companion.

They guard sheep without needing instruction. Enough (outdoor) activity and distraction makes this dog a quiet and well-balanced home companion. This breed is appropriate for people with firm techniques and who can give the dog enough exercise. Early socialization is important, particularly if the dog will be around children. The dogs defend their family and become attached to it.


The Gos d'Atura can compete in dog agility trials, obedience, showmanship, flyball, tracking, and herding events. Herding instincts and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests. Catalan sheepdogs exhibiting basic herding instincts can be trained to compete in herding trials.


Catalan sheepdogs are prone to hip dysplasia. Their average life span is 12 to 14 years.

Catalan Sheepdog in Popular Culture

·         Coronel from One Hundred and One Dalmatians and 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure is a Catalan Sheepdog
·         Einstein and Copernicus from Back to the Future are Catalan Sheepdogs
·         Cobi, the official mascot of the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, is a Catalan Sheepdog.

Catahoula Cur dog

Catahoula Cur-pets-dog breeds

The Catahoula Cur is an American dog breed named after Catahoula Parish, Louisiana, United States. Also known as the Catahoula Leopard Dog or Louisiana Catahoula, it became the state dog of Louisiana in 1979. The breed is sometimes referred to as the "Catahoula Hound" or "Catahoula Leopard Hound" because of its spots, although it is not a true hound but a cur. It is also called the "Catahoula Hog Dog", reflecting its traditional use in hunting wild boar.


As a working dog, Catahoulas have been bred primarily for temperament and ability rather than for appearance. As a result, the physical characteristics of the Catahoula are somewhat varied.


Catahoulas may range greatly in size with males averaging slightly larger than females. Typical height ranges from 20–26 inches (51–66 cm) and weight from 40–112 pounds (18–51 kg).


Catahoulas come in many different colors including blue merle, red merle, brindle, and solid colors. Often, solid coat Catahoulas have small splashes of other colors such as white on their face, legs or chest. The leopard-like coat of most Catahoulas is the result of the merle gene. The merle gene does not normally affect the entire coat of the dog, but dilutes the color only in areas that randomly present the characteristic of the gene. Visually, white coats seem unaffected.

·         Red Leopard: These are various shades of brown and tan, may also have white. Known as "red merle" in other breeds.
·         Blue Leopard: These are various shades of dark greys, black and some may also have white (generally on the feet and chest). Known as "blue merle" in other breeds.
·         Black or Black Leopard: These are leopards least affected by the merle gene but will display smaller patches of blue or gray.
·         Gray or Silver Leopard: Blue Leopards where the black color has been diluted to gray. Known as "slate merle" in other breeds.
·         Tri-color: Catahoulas with three distinct visible colors, usually white, black, and gray.
·         Quad-color: These are Catahoulas with the varying body colorations and trim colors that help to designate the number of colors present on the dogs. Gray Catahoulas may be considered a Quad-color when White and Tan trim are included. This dog would display Black, Gray, White, usually around the neck, face, feet, and tail, and Tan, which may also appear around the face and feet. Most Five-colored dogs are misnamed Quad-colored dogs.
·         Patchwork: These Catahoulas are predominantly white dogs with small amounts of solid and/or merle patches appearing throughout the coat. The colored patches may be black or brown. Dilution may affect those colored patches and produce gray, blue, red, or liver coloration within them.


The texture of a Catahoula's coat may show some variance, being slick/painted-on, spotted, or coarse. All registering bodies that recognize the Catahoula specify a short or slick-coated dog.

Slick coat: This is the most common coat type, featuring fur that is very short and lies close to the body. Such coats dry very rapidly, and because of this, the dog can be cleaned and ready in a matter of minutes. It is often referred to as a "Wash n' Wear" coat.
Coarse coat: This coat is a little longer and fuller than others. It does not require complex maintenance; however, these dogs are not quick to dry when wet. Dogs with this type of coat will often display "feathers" seen on the rear legs, tail, and underbelly, giving them a "fluffy" appearance.


The breed may have "cracked glass" or "marbled glass" eyes (heterochromia) and occurs when both colored and glass portions are present in the same eye. Cracked glass or marbled glass eyes are blue or blue-white in color. Catahoulas with two cracked glass or marble glass eyes are often referred to as having double glass eyes. In some cases, a glass eye will have darker colored sections in it, and vice versa. Cracked glass eyes may be half of one color and half of another. They may just have a streak or spot of another color. Gray eyes are usually cracked glass eyes, made of blue and green, giving them their grayish appearance. The eyes may be of the same color or each of a different color. Eye color can also be ice blue, brown, green, gray, or amber. No particular eye color is typical of Catahoulas. Some have been known to have half of one eye marbled.


The tail of the Catahoula may be long and whip-like, reaching past the hocks of the back legs, or else bobtail, which is a tail that ranges from one vertebra shorter than full length to only one vertebra in total length. The question mark tail is a common tail trait, often with a white tip. The bobtail is a rare but natural part of the Catahoula heritage.


Though most dogs have webbing between the toes, Catahoulas' feet have more prominent webbing which extends almost to the ends of the toes. This foot gives the Catahoula the ability to work marshy areas and gives them great swimming ability.


Catahoulas are highly intelligent and energetic. They are assertive but not aggressive by nature. Catahoulas in general are very even tempered. Males tend to be more obnoxious than females, but Catahoulas are very serious about their job if they are working dogs. They make a good family dog but will not tolerate being isolated, so interaction with the dog is a daily requirement. When a Catahoula is raised with children, the dog believes that it is his or her responsibility to look after and protect those children. Many owners will say that the Catahoula owns them and they can be insistent when it's time to eat or do other activities. Catahoulas are protective and a natural alarm dog. They will alert one to anything out of the ordinary.



These dogs are outstanding bay dogs, or tracking and hunting dogs. They have been known to track animals from miles away, and have been used for hunting feral pigs, squirrel, deer, raccoon, mountain lion, and black bear. They often track silently and only begin to make their distinctive baying bark, eye to eye with the prey, once it is stopped, and hold it in position without touching the animal; using only posture, eyecontact, and lateral shifts.

Catahoulas have been introduced in the Northern Territory of Australia where they have been found to be a superior hunting dog for pigs by breeders. They have been introduced in New Zealand as well as Australia, but the number of Catahoulas there is unclear.


They are used primarily for herding cattle, and pigs by a method of antagonizing and intimidation of herd animals as opposed to the method of all-day boundary patrol and restricting the animals being herded from entering or leaving the designated area. They are good with reindeer. Herding instincts and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests. Catahoulas exhibiting basic herding instincts can be trained to compete in cow/hog dog trials.

The breed is recognized by the United Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club under the "herding dog" breed group.

Health issues


Deafness is one of the major genetic traits in Catahoulas and associated with individuals that are excessively white in color and deafness attributed to a lack of melanocytes. A Catahoula that is predominantly white has an 80% chance of being bi-laterally deaf or uni-laterally hearing.Hearing in one ear is referred to as "directional deafness". Breeders are often unwilling to allow deaf Catahoulas to leave their premises and will generally euthanize deaf pups. Puppies born from a litter where both parents have the "Merle" color pattern have a 25% chance of being born blind, deaf or blind and deaf. These puppies are often referred to as "Double Merles". A double merle can come from any breed, or breed mix. As long as both parents are merle, each puppy has a chance of being born with these traits.

Hip dysplasia

A concern with many breeds, hip dysplasia is dependent on the gene pool and good breeders. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals and PennHIP can help determine whether a specific individual is prone to hip dysplasia through radiographs. Catahoulas are no more apt to have this orthopedic problem than other breeds.

Catahoula lines

There are three lines:

·         The Wright line: The Wright Line was the largest line of Catahoulas at 90 to 110 pounds (40 to 50 kg) and was developed by Mr. Preston Wright. This line represented dogs originally produced from Hernando de Soto's dogs.
·         The Fairbanks line: The Fairbanks line was the next in size at 65 to 75 pounds (30 to 35 kg) and were developed by Mr. Lovie Fairbanks. They were brindle to yellow in color.
·         The McMillin line: The McMillin line was known to be Blue Catahoulas with glass eyes the smallest in size at 50 to 60 pounds (about 25 kg) and were developed by Mr. T. A. McMillin of Sandy Lake, Louisiana. These were Blue Catahoula dogs with glass eyes.
These three lines were crossed back and forth and created the variations of Catahoulas seen today.

Carpathian Shepherd Dog

Carpathian Shepherd Dog-pets-dog breeds

The Carpathian Shepherd Dog (Ciobănesc Românesc Carpatin) is a breed of large sheep dogs that originated in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania.


Alfred Edmund Brehm (1829-1885) in (Animal's Life) wrote about these dogs. The first data regarding the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog was recorded in the Veterinary Science Magazine, year XV, No. 2.

In March 1998, a group of fans of the Carpathian Shepherd Dog founded the Carpathian Shepherd Dogs Club. The club was later renamed the National Club of Carpathian Shepherd Dog Breeders. The club observed that there many Carpathians in Rucăr, Argeş County that are considered ancestors of today's Carpathians.

In March 2003, at Bistriţa, an important conference of the factors involved in the Romanian breeds took place. On July 6, 2005 in Buenos Aires, the approved the provisional homologation of the Carpathian Shepherd Dog.

It is theorized (although not proven) that the various Carpathian Shepherd Dog breeds, as with other livestock guardian and Mountain dog breeds, are descendant from dogs that were developed somewhere around 9,000 years ago in Mesopotamia following the domestication of sheep and goats in the same area.


The breed has a life expectancy of about 12-14 years.


A very devoted, well-mannered, courageous dog, it has been said to battle bears in an attempt to protect flocks of sheep or his master from harm.

Caucasian Shepherd Dog

The Caucasian Shepherd Dog is a large breed of dog that is popular in Russia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia. It is extremely popu...

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